NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

Our investor and analyst presentations may include the non-generally accepted accounting principle ("non-GAAP") financial measures of gross operating margin, distributable cash flow, free cash flow and adjusted EBITDA. These presentations summarize how these non-GAAP financial measures are reconciled to their most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("GAAP"). Our non-GAAP financial measures should not be considered as alternatives to GAAP measures such as net income, operating income, net cash flows provided by operating activities or any other GAAP measure of liquidity or financial performance.

Gross Operating Margin: We evaluate segment performance based on our financial measure of gross operating margin. Gross operating margin is an important performance measure of the core profitability of our operations and forms the basis of our internal financial reporting. We believe that investors benefit from having access to the same financial measures that our management uses in evaluating segment results. Gross operating margin is exclusive of other income and expense transactions, provision for income taxes, the cumulative effect of changes in accounting principles and extraordinary charges. Gross operating margin is presented on a 100 percent basis before any allocation of earnings to noncontrolling interests. We define total segment gross operating margin as operating income before:

  • depreciation, amortization and accretion expenses;
  • non-cash asset impairment charges;
  • gains and losses from asset sales and related transactions; and
  • general and administrative costs.

Our calculation of gross operating margin may or may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies. The GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to total segment gross operating margin is operating income. For additional information regarding gross operating margin, see Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included under Item 8 of our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

Distributable Cash Flow: We measure available cash by reference to distributable cash flow ("DCF"), which is a non-GAAP cash flow measure. DCF is an important financial measure for our limited partners since it serves as an indicator of our success in providing a cash return on investment. Specifically, this financial measure indicates to investors whether or not we are generating cash flows at a level that can sustain our declared quarterly cash distributions. DCF is also a quantitative standard used by the investment community with respect to publicly traded partnerships since the value of a partnership unit is, in part, measured by its yield, which is based on the amount of cash distributions a partnership can pay to a unitholder. Our management compares the DCF we generate to the cash distributions we expect to pay our partners. Using this metric, management computes our distribution coverage ratio.

Our calculation of DCF may or may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies. The GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to DCF is net cash flows provided by operating activities. For additional information regarding DCF, see "Non-GAAP Cash Flow Measures" included under Item 7 of our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

Free Cash Flow: Free cash flow ("FCF") is a traditional cash flow metric that is widely used by a variety of investors and other participants in the financial community, as opposed to DCF, which is a cash flow measure primarily used by investors and others in evaluating master limited partnerships. In general, FCF is a measure of how much cash flow a business generates during a specified time period after accounting for all capital investments, including expenditures for growth and sustaining capital projects. By comparison, only sustaining capital expenditures are reflected in DCF. We believe that FCF is important to traditional investors since it reflects the amount of cash available for reducing debt, investing in additional capital projects, paying distributions, common unit repurchases and similar matters. Since business partners fund certain capital projects of our consolidated subsidiaries, our determination of FCF reflects the amount of cash we receive from noncontrolling interests, net of any distributions paid to such interests. 

Our calculation of FCF may or may not be comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies. The GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to FCF is net cash flows provided by operating activities. For additional information regarding FCF, see "Non-GAAP Cash Flow Measures" included under Item 7 of our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

Adjusted EBITDA: Adjusted EBITDA is commonly used as a supplemental financial measure by our management and external users of our financial statements, such as investors, commercial banks, research analysts and rating agencies, to assess the financial performance of our assets without regard to financing methods, capital structures or historical cost basis; the ability of our assets to generate cash sufficient to pay interest and support our indebtedness; and the viability of projects and the overall rates of return on alternative investment opportunities. 

Since Adjusted EBITDA excludes some, but not all, items that affect net income or loss and because these measures may vary among other companies, our calculation of Adjusted EBITDA may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies. The GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to Adjusted EBITDA is net cash flow provided by operating activities.